Fingernail-sized chip can repair damaged tissue in seconds

A new device can begin repairing damaged organs in seconds, heralding a major breakthrough for life-saving medicine. The technology known as tissue nanotransfection (TNT) uses a small coin-sized silicon chip that “injects” genetic code into skin cells, converting them from one type to another. The technology weighs less than 100 grams and has a long shelf life. It’s completely non-invasive — the genetic code is delivered by zapping the device with a small electrical charge that’s barely felt by the patient — and the procedure can be carried out without access to a lab or hospital. This means it will have a significant impact on the lives of those involved in medical emergencies where time is a crucial factor, such as car crash victims and soldiers injured in the field.
https://wexnermedical.osu.edu/mediaroom/pressreleaselisting/researchers-develop-regenerative-medicine-breakthrough

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